10 best iPhone apps for Christians

Here are my picks for the 10 best iPhone apps for Christians!

10 – The Bible Memory App (iPhone App)

Scripture memorization isn’t just for Sunday school kids. Hiding passages of the Bible in your heart gives you a great well of truth to draw from when you are facing temptation or trial. Daily Bible reading is one way, but a dedicated plan for Scripture memorization is another way to saturate your mind with God’s Word. It can also provide the fuel for biblical meditation throughout your day.

The Bible Memory is a Christian app which makes memorizing verses just that much easier. More than mere flash cards, this app systematically removes words in the verses you are attempting to memorize until you can type the whole thing from memory. It also has prompts for when to review the verses you have already mastered so that you retain them over time.

9 – Sermon Audio App (iPhone App)

God designed His Word to be preached. Sitting under sound preaching in a local church is an act of worship and foundational to spiritual growth. But one of the special blessings we enjoy in this age of the internet is access to lots and lots of great preaching to supplement what we receive from our local pastor.

I have used the Sermon Audio website for years. It provides the ability to find preachers from around the world to listen to. You can search by name, topic, or Bible passage. This handy Sermon Audio app makes it easy to stream or download a sermon. And if your church uses Sermon Audio, you can set it up so that you are tracking with all of your pastor’s latest messages.

8 – Overcast App (iPhone App)

I find the default iOS podcast app to be frustrating and unintuitive. I recently made the switch, therefore, to Overcast. Overcast is an award winning podcast app that organizes you podcasts in a simple way. But why am I even recommending a podcast app at all on my list of the best Christian apps?

There are tons of great Christian podcasts out there. I’ve mentioned at least one before. But podcasts are a great way to keep up with what’s going on in the Christian world or, like sermon audio, to get the latest sermons from your church or other preachers you like.

So, whether you’ve been using the default podcasts app for a while or have never even tried listening to podcasts, I recommend you download the free Overcast app and add it to your personal list of best Christian apps for iPhone.

7 – You Need a Budget App (iPhone App)

We’ve talked before about the importance of having a budget for financial stewardship. And I even wrote a post on the best budgeting software for Christians, You Need a Budget. So, I’ve included the YNAB app in this list of best Christian apps. Because for me it is a critical component to ensuring that I am being the wisest steward I can possibly be with God’s resources.

While the app itself is free, you need to be a YNAB customer to use the service. Check out my full article on YNAB for more information on this great budgeting software.

6 – RefNet App (iPhone App)

Podcasts and sermons are great, but sometimes you just want to turn on the radio and let someone else pick what to listen to. You can try your local Christian radio station, but nine times out of ten you’ll either be tuning into straight heresy or just sentimental tripe (no strong opinions here, folks).

RefNet from the folks at Ligonier Ministries is a wonderful internet radio station which curates excellent sermons and teaching from trusted teachers along with elevated worship music and Bible reading. The iPhone app is a great way to bring RefNet with you wherever you go which is why it is number 6 on the 10 best Christians apps for iPhone.

5 – The Study Bible App (iPhone App)

I keep several Bible apps on my phone. In fact, the one I use the most, Accordance, isn’t even on this list because I thought it would be too specialized. But one Bible app I keep on my iPhone is The Study Bible by Grace to You.

It’s quite a nice app and includes the ability to listen to an audio Bible companion to whatever passage you are on. But the killer feature to this app is that for an in-app purchase you can get all of the notes from the MacArthur Study Bible. I frequently find myself referencing this resource. So, having it in my pocket is tremendously handy. It also gives the ability to access all of MacArthur’s sermon archives from within the Bible app as well.

4 – Productive – Habit Tracker App (iPhone App)

I am a strong believer in healthy habits. Training yourself for holiness includes daily rhythms that gradually over time shape you into the man or woman God wants you to be. But habits are hard to form, so I’ll take any help I can get!

One app I’ve found to be helpful in forming habits is Productive. It allows you to set up habits and the frequency with which you would like to do them (e.g. daily, weekly, only on Sundays, etc.) and it will remind you at certain times to do them and ask you to log whether you have or haven’t performed that habit. It gives you rewards for keeping up a streak and gives you a good historical picture of how well you’ve done. There’s nothing like looking back on your calendar and seeing that you haven’t broken that streak for an entire month.

I’ve used this app to track daily Bible reading and prayer habits, exercise, and even to track things I want to avoid doing. The digital accountability this app provides is why it’s number four on the 10 best iPhone apps for Christians.

3 – Grace to You Sermons App (iPhone App)

If you want solid expository verse-by-verse teaching, John MacArthur is your man. And the Grace to You Sermons app is your ticket to all of pastor John’s massive sermon archive.

This guy has preached verse-by-verse through the entire New Testament. So, if you’re wanting to hear a sermon on any passage in the New Testament, this app has you covered. I have had this app on my phone for years so I can listen to the daily GTY broadcast. I really think this is one of the best iPhone apps for Christians, which is why it takes the number three spot on this list.

2 – Prayer Mate App (iPhone App)

How many times have you told someone “I’ll pray for you” and then immediately forgotten? Prayer Mate is a simple and handy app that allows you to store up all of the things you want to be praying about and have it give you a prayer list each day. This app helps you not to forget so that you continue to pray with perseverance until the Lord answers.

One of the coolest thing about tracking prayer requests over the long-term is when you get to change a daily prayer request from a request into a praise because you have seen it be answered. It’s also really neat to be able to text a friend and let them know you are praying for something specific they told you about months or even years ago. That is tremendously encouraging.

1 – Bible App (iPhone App)

The Bible App by Life Church is simply the best Bible app for the iPhone. There is no contest. That is why it tops the list of the 10 best iPhone apps for Christians. This app has every translation you can imagine, an excellent user interface, and other great features like daily Bible reading plans and devotionals. The best part is it’s all free.

Billy Graham’s Grandson Back in the Pulpit following Cheating Scandal

Former preacher and grandson of the late great evangelist Billy Graham is set to take the pulpit once again, just a few years after being embroiled in a career-ending cheating scandal.

Tullian Tchividjian, 47, recently launched a new community of faith in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, called “The Sanctuary.” On its new website, the church states that its mission is “to be a church where God’s boundless love meets a broken world.”

“As we prepare to launch in the fall, we are currently meeting every Sunday morning at 10:30,” reads the short blurb. “Feel free to join us and to bring a friend.”

In July of 2015, Tullian resigned from the post of senior pastor at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in Florida after admitting an extramarital affair. He was then hired by Willow Creek in Winter Springs, Florida, before being fired after disclosing another previous affair. Since then, the preacher has been posting regularly on Twitter, addressing subjects of grace, forgiveness and the problem of sin.

“You are not defined by your worst moments,” the preacher tweeted recently. “You are not defined by your greatest accomplishments. You are not defined by what others think of you OR what you think about yourself. You are not defined by what you do or fail to do. You are defined by what God has done for you.”

Still, despite his supposed posture of repentance, many have expressed that Tchividjian should not be looking to head up a church just a few years after two instances of infidelity saw him be stripped of his preaching license. Many have pointed out that Tullian has yet to formally repent of his indiscretions.

“After an extramarital affair & getting defrocked by So Florida Presbytery, Billy Graham’s grandson @TullianT is back & planting a church in South Florida,” tweeted investigative journalist Julie Roys. “No apology for sexual misconduct & pastoral abuse, just denials.”

“Some people think that I should just shut up and crawl in a cave and never come out because I’m not qualified to be leading spiritually in any way because of everything that I went through and everything that I did,” the ex-pastor told the Palm Beach Post. “Other people champion it because they go, ‘It’s about time that churches are led by people who know what it feels like to, you know, fall on their face and be in the gutter.’”

At the end of his sermon this past Sunday, Tullian personally addressed his failings from a few years back.

“I screwed up, and people got hurt because of me,” he said. “It is like it happened yesterday when I sat my children down in my living room and told them what I had done. I will never forget the ways in which I hurt them… the way I betrayed my first wife.”

Tullian said that he still deals with “a level of guilt and shame and regret,” arising from his past sins.

“I don’t think it will ever fully go away,” he explained. “It’s probably a gift to me honestly, because it keeps me dependent on God and makes me realize afresh that His grace is undeserved.”

Source: christianheadlines.com

Trump Administration Will Spare Bibles from Tariffs on Chinese Goods

The Trump administration has decided to give Bibles a free pass amid an escalating tariff war between the U.S. and China.

In May, Christian publishers began to panic as bibles and other religious texts printed in China, together totaling some 65 percent of the 2018 U.S. brochures and leaflet imports, were set to be slapped with tariffs of up to 25 percent.

On Tuesday, however, the U.S. Trade Representative’s Office (USTR) published two lists of items that will be subjected to a 10% hike in tariff charge starting in September and December respectively — the Bible, USTR said, will be spared from both.

“Bibles and other religious literature are among the items removed from the tariff list and will not face additional tariffs of 10 percent,” USTR confirmed to Christianity Today in a statement.

Christian publishers and Bible translators were becoming increasingly concerned by the Trump administration’s refusal to back down from a trade war with China and repeatedly warned that financial restrictions on the printing of the good book would restrict its proliferation across the globe.

“For the past several months, there has been great concern among the Christian publishing community that our important work would be threatened by proposed tariff schedules,” the president and CEO of LifeWay Christian Resources, Ben Mandrell, told CT. “Today’s announcement by [USTR] has given us hope that the administration has heard our concern.”

Mandrell did, however, express concern at the word of God being “taken hostage in an international trade dispute.”

Other items that evaded the tariff charge included child safety seats, cranes used in ports and construction, shipping containers and certain types of fish, according to Reuters. Interestingly, rosaries, which are a staple in Catholic religious practice, remain on the earlier tariff list — they will fall victim to a 10% tax when the new charges come into effect September 1.

Still, the decision to axe tariffs on the importing of Bibles has been widely celebrated by Christian leaders. “I am pleased to see today that US tariffs on China will now exempt the Bibles printed in China,” tweeted Russell Moore, President of The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC) of the Southern Baptist Convention. The announcement is “welcome news” for many publishers and ministries, he added.

The ERLC also clarified why such an overwhelming proportion of American Bibles are printed in China as opposed to at home in the United States.

“Like encyclopedias and textbooks, Bibles contain a large amount of text that must be formatted to a bound book on thin paper. China has been specializing in this printing technology for decades and is home to the world’s largest Bible-printing company, printing at least 150 million Bibles in 2016,” the ERLC explained. “To import Bibles from a country other than China would require time, extensive quality tests, and higher prices incompatible with the high and consistent demand for Bibles in the United States.”

Source:
https://www.christianheadlines.com/contributors/will-maule/trump-administration-spares-bibles-from-tariffs-on-chinese-goods.html

The U.S. Church Isn’t Dying and Young People Aren’t Fleeing, Says Myth-Busting Book

You’ve likely heard the conventional wisdom: The U.S. church is shrinking. Teenagers and young adults are leaving in droves. Atheism and unbelief are growing rapidly.

But a new book challenges those assumptions – and even says the truth is exactly the opposite.

The book, Myth of the Dying Church: How Christianity Is Actually Thriving in America and the World by author Glenn T. Stanton, asserts that church attendance in the United States is at an all-time high, both in raw numbers and as a percentage of the population. That includes the colonial days.

Stanton also says Americans are more attracted to Bible-believing churches that discuss sin and salvation than to liberal churches that avoid both topics.

Stanton – the director of family formation studies at Focus on the Family – examined multiple studies and bodies of research for the book.

Christian Headlines recently spoke to him. Following is a transcript:

We hear so often that the church is shrinking today – that young people are leaving the faith, and Christianity is disappearing. You say this is not so. Why?

First, as I got into the research while writing the book, I was really surprised how much stronger the data on this topic actually is. It tells this story: The best forms of Christianity, faithful, Bible-teaching churches calling its members to real discipleship and vibrant worship, are holding very strong, even growing in some ways. The most troubling forms, those that’ve compromised on things like the deity of Christ, the historicity of the resurrection, the reality of sin and miracles as well as caving on issues of sexuality, abortion and homosexuality, those churches are hemorrhaging members by the millions and have been for decades. So the story here is a separating of the wheat and the tares, but certainly not a decline of Christianity.

So America is not becoming more secular, more unbelieving?

Not in terms of the people themselves. Yes, our culture seems to be in terms of media, Hollywood and journalists. But when it comes to people themselves, there is certainly not a mass move toward unbelief. I read an article recently from a major conservative news source that said atheism is the largest “religious” group in our nation. Not even close, for goodness sake. The Pew Research Center tells us that only 3 percent of the U.S. population is atheist. Only 4 percent are agnostics. For the people of truth, we can spread a great deal of falsehood. I’m trying to change that through this book.

We hear so much about the growth of the so-called “nones” – those who say they no longer identify with any institutional church. You say these “nones” are not what most people have been told–that they don’t represent a growing population of new unbelievers. Explain what you mean.

The nones are certainly the most misunderstood, and therefore most misreported, part of the story in all of this. Most leading, university-based sociologists of religion explain these are certainly not a new and growing category of unbelievers. The nones are largely those who were never really attached to a church in the first place. They are folks who might have said, “Yes, I’m Methodist” or “I’m Baptist” but they were actually only CEO Christians… Christmas and Easter Only types. Their pastor never knew who they were. But now, based on how survey questions are being asked, they are more comfortable being honest, saying they have no real connection to any institutional church.

Thus, the nones only mark a new categorization, not new unbelievers. Again, like the Harvard/Indiana research and other sources explain, there is not a growing secularization among people in the United States.

We also hear about young people leaving the church in largenumbers–that they are losing interest in matters of faith. You say that’s not true. What did you discover?

This is a very interesting finding of the book. First, we must know that every generation has seen their young people cool their faith practices. If you read the Puritans of the colonial days, they complained about the very troubling secularization of their young people. There never was a golden age of stalwart young believers. Goodness, look at the kids of the parents that had direct, audible intimacy with God. Cain killing Abel could be understood as “walking away from the faith.” The Prodigal Son also. So this age of development has always seen more “independence” in many areas of life. It’s the nature of moving into one’s own adulthood. Nothing new there.

But the truth is that we have more young people, age 18-29, regularly attending church today than in the early 1970s. That was the time of the really remarkable revival of the Jesus Movement. And where are they going? To the more conservative, vibrant evangelical churches.

Young people are not bailing on biblical Christianity. It speaks to the emptiness of the human heart and soul, and it does so to young adults.

People will often tell Christians they need to get with the times, stop talking about sin, miracles, salvation and start accepting things like gay marriage, sexual freedom and abortion or the church will die. You claim the exact opposite is true. Why?

This is one of the strongest and most interesting findings of the book. I included a chapter in the book, one I didn’t originally plan on, entitled “Stick a Fork in It: The Major Fail of Liberal Christianity.” It’s time to call the liberalizing effort in the church a major failure. People are voting with their feet. They are leaving the liberal, compromising churches in massive numbers. Some of those are just tossing the faith while others are going across the street to the more faithful evangelical churches, those that actually believe Christianity is true.

Get this very interesting finding: Two scholars from Columbia University and UCLA investigated where same-sex attracted individuals who attend church, choose to go. To their utter shock –they are very pro-gay researchers –they found that such people are 2.5 times more likely to attend more conservative churches, those holding an unapologetically biblical stance on sexuality. These scholars could not understand why gay- and lesbian-identified folks would choose to go to such “gay-hostile” churches. Well, maybe they find them to be quite kind and gracious, and the Bible teaching and worship enriching to their lives. The very people the rainbow flag-waving “we welcome all” churches are trying to attract are not interested in their liberalizing compromises. We must never forget that people will be attracted to the loving and truthful presentation of Christ’s life-giving Gospel.

What’s happening with the Christian church around the globe? Is there any good news there?

Oh goodness. Philip Jenkins from Baylor University is perhaps the leading sociologist of religion on the global picture. He says the Christian Church is absolutely exploding in most parts of the world, particularly what scholars call the Global South. It is exploding on the African continent, South America, China and throughout many parts of Asia. God’s Word is doing everything but returning void.

It is important for us to have faith in the unquenchable work of the Holy Spirit. What He did at Pentecost, where “many were being continually added to their numbers daily,” He is still doing today. His character and power dictates that He cannot do otherwise. The Church is in very good hands.

So not only is the “church is dying” mantra bad sociology, but it’s also bad theology.

Source:
https://www.christianheadlines.com/contributors/michael-foust/the-u-s-church-isn-t-dying-and-young-people-aren-t-fleeing-says-myth-busting-book.html

Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg Says ‘Church’ is Inspiration for Future of Social Media Site

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has said he hopes to turn the popular social media platform into a “church” of sorts – a place where users accomplish great things together and influence their community for the better.

“It’s so striking that for decades, membership in all kinds of groups has declined as much as one-quarter,” he said during a rally for Facebook users who’ve built large community-support groups on the site, according to CNBC. “That’s a lot of of people who now need to find a sense of purpose and support somewhere else.”

He added, “People who go to church are more likely to volunteer and give to charity – not just because they’re religious, but because they’re part of a community.”

Zuckerberg continued: “A church doesn’t just come together. It has a pastor who cares for the well-being of their congregation, makes sure they have food and shelter. A little league team has a coach who motivates the kids and helps them hit better. Leaders set the culture, inspire us, give us a safety net, and look out for us.”

As earlier reported by GH, Zuckerberg earlier this year met with a group of pastors in Waco, Texas to understand more about how churches and faith communities find “deeper meaning” in an ever-changing world.

In a Facebook post, he explained: “I met with ministers in Waco who are helping their congregations find deeper meaning in a changing world … This trip has helped me understand just how important community is, and how we’re all just looking for something we can trust. We may come from different backgrounds, but we all want to find purpose and authenticity in something bigger than ourselves.”

During his trip, which was part of his “Mark’s Year of Travel” campaign, Zuckerberg also met with “young moms … who moved back to their town because they want their kids to be raised with the same values they grew up with.”

Earlier this year, 32-year-old billionaire recently announced he is no longer an atheist, but in fact sees religion as “very important”. Last year, Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, met with Pope Francis to discuss ways that technology could help the poor.

Following the visit, Zuckerberg took to social media to shared their admiration for the pontiff’s ability to connect with people of different faiths while remaining true to his own.

“Priscilla and I had the honor of meeting Pope Francis at the Vatican. We told him how much we admire his message of mercy and tenderness, and how he’s found new ways to communicate with people of every faith around the world,” Zuckerberg wrote in a Facebook message.

“We also discussed the importance of connecting people, especially in parts of the world without internet access. We gave him a model of Aquila, our solar-powered aircraft that will beam internet connectivity to places that don’t have it. And we shared our work with the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to help people around the world,” he added.

“It was a meeting we’ll never forget. You can feel his warmth and kindness, and how deeply he cares about helping people.”

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Meet the Christian Tech Executive Who Wants to Save Silicon Valley’s Soul

Of all the rituals of modern life that Silicon Valley technologists have burrowed their way into — eating, exercising, communicating, doing the laundry — one ritual that’s stayed largely undisrupted is religion. Despite its other advances, Silicon Valley remains one of the least religious parts of the country.

Vincent “Skip” Vaccarello is trying to change that. A 30-year veteran of the tech industry, Vaccarello was an executive at VisiCorp, an early PC-software-maker, and has been the CEO of Applied Weather Technology and Communications Solutions Inc., as well as a division manager for 3Com. He’s also a Christian, and has spent the last two decades trying to spread the gospel to Silicon Valley’s masses. He’s the chair of the Silicon Valley Prayer Breakfast, and the author of “Finding God in Silicon Valley,” a blog containing interviews with prominent Silicon Valley Christians that he is hoping to turn into a book.

I spoke to Vaccarello about his blog, his efforts to evangelize Silicon Valley, and what makes it hard to convert the tech-savvy. Here’s a condensed and edited version of our conversation.

Tech workers in Silicon Valley tend to be young, progressive, and very secular. Is this the hardest community in America to convert?

It is. George Barna [the evangelical pollster] did a survey and indicated that on any given Sunday, less than 5 percent of the people in Silicon Valley go to church. Silicon Valley people are smart skeptics. They also tend to live isolated lives. There are many transplants from other countries and states. Many of those people have not developed deep relationships. They desire to be successful. They want to change the world.

But at the same time, people are very skeptical of Christianity. Among the more successful, there’s a complacency. They think, Life seems great, I’ve got my stock options.

The guiding principle of Silicon Valley seems to be that the world can be perfected through technology. That hope seems to substitute for religious purpose in a lot of the tech people I know. Is that something you’ve seen?

I’d agree with that. I have a friend who did a book called Soul in Silicon, and his conclusion was that Silicon Valley is actually a very spiritual place, but that some of it is what you mentioned — people are, in a way, worshiping technology and success.

What I’ve found is that God is at work in Silicon Valley in the lives of many people. There really is a very committed group of people who have the desire to help others in their faith, who are committed to charity, who want to make the world a better place.

For a lot of people in Silicon Valley, though, the attitude seems to be that doing the work of technological advancement itself is a form of charity — that the world is better because they’re succeeding.

I’ve had many people say that. But people go through setbacks. It might be a divorce. It might be that stock options that were worth millions are now worth nothing. Or maybe they get fired from a job. When that happens, there are opportunities to talk about something that’s more important.

You’re saying there’s a counter-cyclical thing going on? When the tech bubble bursts and things are really bad for Silicon Valley companies, it will be good for Silicon Valley churches?

I do think there are absolutely those opportunities. I remember back in 1989, when the earthquake happened, Silicon Valley churches were packed with people. People were shaken up by it. People were saying, “There has to be something else.”

Skip, what made you decide to take up this cause?

I grew up in the Boston area – loving family, attended a Catholic church. But I was also a child of the late sixties and early seventies. And during college at Harvard, I kind of walked away from faith. Then, about twenty years later, a few people came into my life, and I began to think about faith. During that time, I was mostly building a career and a family. But the birth of our first child, I felt, was a miracle. And then our neighbors invited my wife to church. I was in Paris on business at the time, but she dragged me along when I got back. That was in the mid-eighties.

So I listened to what the pastor had to say, and over the next several months, I investigated the evidence for Christianity and really came to faith. And from that point forward, I really had a desire to live out my faith. So I got together a group of Silicon Valley executives, to say, “Well, how do we live out our faith day-to-day?”

And when did the blog come into play?

I went back to a Harvard reunion in 2008. There was a group of Christians who got together for a discussion, and right after that meeting, we got a book called Finding God at Harvard by Kelly Monroe. That planted a seed in my own mind to do something similar for Silicon Valley. One of [Monroe’s] purposes in writing that book was to show that you can be intelligent and still have faith. In Silicon Valley, a lot of people put material things and their career first, but I found it was really only God who could fill that space.

As a Christian in tech, what do you make of this issue, which seems to be a very contentious one, about start-ups and the homeless? Some tech workers have been publicly disparaging the homeless, saying that they need to get out of the “respectable” communities of Silicon Valley and go somewhere else.

I would hope that someone who is a follower of Christ would approach it differently. We’re to take care of the poor and the homeless.

Say you have a 22-year-old Google employee who is not religious, who is making a lot of money and living in Silicon Valley. How would you approach them and convince them to find Jesus?

There’s probably nothing I could do to convince such a person. It may sound odd, but it’s up to God. My hope is that some of the things I’m doing here will help. Service is one of the important ways to do it. Young people, whether they’re a Christian or not, have a desire to serve other people. That person might have his or her eyes opened if they were to go to a homeless shelter, to CityTeam or Freedom House, and in the process, they say, “Why are you doing this?” And we say, “Well, I’m a follower of Christ, and this is what I’m supposed to do.”

We also live in a little bit of a celebrity culture. I’m hoping that people might see someone like Pat Gelsinger, the CEO of VMWare, and a very committed follower of Christ, that someone might look at him and say, “Well, he’s different.” But if you’re talking about someone that’s happy, with lot of stock options and a cushy job at Google, it’s going to be difficult.

Who would be the ultimate convert? Mark Zuckerberg? Jack Dorsey?

Well, yeah, those are the current heroes. If any of those people were to say, “Okay, I’ve found the key to life,” that’d be great.

But some of it is going to come through service. The deficit that many Christians face is that people look at followers of Christ more for what they’re against than what they’re for.

That’s a big thing, I think. If you ask people in Silicon Valley why they’re not evangelicals, a lot would say, “Because I support gay marriage,” or “Because I support a woman’s right to choose.” How do you get around that?

There are people on the right and the left that are followers of Christ. But it’s unfortunate in some ways that Christianity has been identified exclusively as a right-wing group. When I have discussions with people, I don’t get into politics. To me, it’s not about politics. If someone’s gay, they’re gay, and that’s their lifestyle. I would talk more about the person of Christ.

Part of what’s interesting to me, about all of this, is that Silicon Valley is actually a place with a ton of faith. It’s just not faith in God. It’s faith in technology, in the future, in the power of innovation to shape society. Is there any way in which Silicon Valley might actually be well-suited to a religious revival?

People here live isolated lives. Christianity is about relationships and community. Yesterday, I was interviewing a guy, he’s a biotech guy, he’s brilliant. God has given him the mission in life of helping make the world a better place through biotechnology. He’s been doing stuff that is saving millions of lives with the product his company made.

Other people feel they’re on a mission to change the world in other ways. And maybe they make a billion dollars. But my hope is that when people go through a tough time, they’ll look at the site or read the book, find out more about what it is, and say, “Maybe these people aren’t as crazy as I thought they were.”