Christians that Trust in God Can Expect 10 Beautiful Things to Happen

Trust. A word filled with powerful meaning. Where do you place trust? Perhaps in yourself, other people, things, or situations? Or do you trust in the Lord with all your heart? Maybe the answer is a little of both. Some moments trust is in the Lord, and other moments, trust is put in the wrong place or person. Times have come and will continue to come where we will have to decide where to place trust. The decision we make can impact us and others. Trusting God is important to developing a closer relationship with Him.

When we cross the street, watching for vehicles helps us to trust we will cross the road safely. When receiving a disturbing medical diagnosis, we trust the doctors to provide the correct treatment. Has someone trusted you to keep a secret? Perhaps you have asked someone to trust you during a stressful time. Uncertain times can be filled with fear and worry. Placing our trust in the Lord will help us navigate through every situation.

Humans make mistakes. God does not make mistakes.

Sometimes when wrong decisions are made, trust has to be rebuilt. Trusting that a relationship is honest and will continue in a positive way can cause grief if that trust is broken with mistakes and dishonesty. Trusting that person again may take time. God can help heal relationships when we ask Him for help if that is His plan.

With God, trust never wavers. We can trust Him with all our heart and know His love is forever. God will always listen and hear when we cry out to Him. If our hearts are troubled and we aren’t sure where to place trust, we can find strength in knowing we can trust God with all our heart.

Problems can’t be solved on our own. Placing our trust in God can give us the courage to face obstacles. We are not alone and don’t have to face any situation alone. God is with us.

What Does it Mean to ‘Trust in the Lord with All Your Heart?’
Have you heard someone say “I trust in the Lord with all my heart.” or maybe “Trust in the Lord with all your heart.”? What does the person saying those words mean? If you have spoken or written those words, what was the meaning you were trying to convey? The statement may be a way of hopefully making someone feel better. Trusting in the Lord with all your heart means that you have given your full trust to Him. You have placed your faith and trust in God.

Knowing that God is with us in every moment can help us through troubled times. A situation may not turn out the way we hoped and prayed for, yet our trust and hope are found in going to God.

There are times when we may try to solve problems on our own. A busy life may cause us to put aside prayer and worship time. The list of things to do overwhelms us. Worship and prayer may not be at the top of the list due to the focus being placed on self and our circumstances.

As those times arise, go to God. Ask Him for help. Place your trust in the Lord and release your burdens (Proverbs 3:5-6 NIV).

Not trusting in God with all our heart can mean that a person trusts someone or something other than God. Trusting God helps us worship and praise Him. In trusting God, we give Him the glory.

Is it Really Possible to Put Your Full Trust in the Lord with All of Your Heart?
You may have heard someone say, “I trust the Lord, but, I want to move things along.” Someone may make the comment, “I try to trust in the Lord. I need the answer to come quickly.” As we hear those words or possibly speak them ourselves, we may realize that we are not fully trusting God.

Fear is not from the Lord. As humans, we often fear the unknown. Once we recognize that we are afraid, we can pray and ask God for guidance. Prayer is a great step in placing our full trust in the Lord (Psalm 28:7).

God will answer in His timing and in His way.

Placing our full trust in the Lord brings us to a closer relationship with Him. He knows our thoughts and our hearts.

As we place our full trust in Him, we acknowledge our own weaknesses and the need for Him.

Praying and giving thanks to God in every situation can help our faith grow. We are leading by example when we trust in God.

What Does the Bible Say about Trusting in the Lord with All Your Heart during Uncertain Times
The Bible provides words of encouragement and reminders of how we are called to trust God in uncertain times. We are also called to trust God in good times. In other words, trust God at all times (Psalm 46:1-32 NIV).

Going to God allows us to find refuge and strength. He will provide the peace, comfort, and rest that we seek.

Scripture shares how we will go through troubled times, and God will never leave us. Placing our trust and faith in God reminds us of the mercy and love He has for His children.

We may not know the reason for everything that happens. Although we may want to know why God has allowed certain events, placing our trust in Him allows us to remember He has the answers. Our call is to follow Him and help lead others to Him. God’s love is steadfast and faithful.

10 Beautiful Things That Happen When You Trust in God with All Your Heart
What will happen when you trust in God with all your heart? Will your life be changed? The possibilities are endless. His love for us is immeasurable. We can place our trust in Him and rest assured we are safe in His arms.

Trusting God with all your heart allows beautiful things to happen.

  1. Our relationship with God becomes stronger.
  2. We are released from carrying the burdens alone.
  3. We are reminded of the love God has for His children.
  4. Peace and comfort are found in trusting God.
  5. Rest and renewal can fill the body when trust is placed in God.
  6. Through trusting God, we can help lead others to Him.
  7. In trusting God, we are able to give up control.
  8. We are following the call to rely on God, and not ourselves.
  9. When we place our trust in God, we are showing our love for Him.
  10. When we trust in God with all our heart, we acknowledge His plan and His love for us.

Trust in God with all your heart. Worship and praise Him in every moment through words and actions. Share your faith with others. Trusting God releases the need to control events in life. How wonderful to be loved by Him.

Father, thank You for loving us. Thank You for helping us when our trust is placed in other places or in other people. Thank You for searching for your children and leading us back to You. We acknowledge that at times we try to control situations. Please forgive us. Help us to remember You have a plan and that plan is best. Father, help us to place our trust in You. In the name of Jesus, Amen.

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Russian Attack On America’s Power Grid “Imminent?” – CLICK HERE FOR INFO!

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If You Believe in God, CLICK HERE to Watch This. It Will Blow Your Mind!

Shocking Truth About The Biggest Threat To Come – CLICK HERE FOR INFO!

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Ten Ways to Encourage Your Teen’s Prayer Life

My parent’s used a few of the ten methods below to help encouraged me to pray and to become a better Christian overall when I was a teenager…I’m not a parent yet, but if you’re a parent that’s reading this, and are having a difficult time getting your teen to pray, then I suggest these 10 methods of encouragement below because they really do work…

  1. Be an Example

We aren’t going to be much help to teens if we’re leading with a “do what I say, not what I do” perspective. We need to encourage teen’s prayer life by modeling our own. Let your kids of all ages see you pray. Let them know when you’re having your quiet time with the Lord.

Initiate prayer in front of them—and not just around the dinner table (though that’s a great start!) Start small but start somewhere!

  1. Talk about Prayer Organically

Normalize prayer. Don’t let it become an awkward, taboo subject in your family. Talk about it! Ask your kids if they’ve prayed today. Talk about the reasons maybe why they didn’t. Never shame or punish if they forgot or didn’t make the effort—but discuss it and see what is holding them back so you know how to help.

But if you don’t talk about prayer with your kids, it’s going to be rare that it’s in their minds frequently enough to do it on their own.

  1. Point out That Prayer Isn’t Always Formal

Sometimes, teenagers hold back from something new because they don’t want to get it wrong or embarrass themselves. So make sure your teenagers know that prayer doesn’t have to be formal or stilted.

They’re not going to “mess it up”. They don’t have to be on their knees or in a certain room or pray at a certain time of day. There’s nothing legalistic about talking to the Lord! Tell them they can prayer anytime, right where they are—whether that’s in the school hallway, in the car, on the ball field, or even in the shower.

While it’s important to come to the Lord with respect and reverence, it’s of the utmost importance just to simply come. Hebrews 4:16 (ESV) Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.

  1. Buy Them Books/Find Podcasts on Prayer

If your teen enjoys reading, there are so many quality books on prayer that you could purchase for them as a guide. Ask your church friends or online community for recommendations, and get your teen set up with some nonfiction books to help develop this area of their life.

Sometimes, reading about someone else’s experiences can help pave the way to make our own. If your teen needs an icebreaker, reading a book on prayer could really make a difference in their life. If your teen isn’t a reader, but loves listening to audiobooks or podcasts, research some quality Christian podcasts that tackle the topic of prayer, and invite them to listen.

  1. Read the Lord’s Prayer Together

Jesus gave us an example of how to pray in Scripture. It would be incredibly beneficial to discuss that model prayer together as a family and dissect it. The Lord’s Prayer isn’t meant to be the way we pray as a rote citation, but rather, a template to follow where we can plug in our own thoughts, thanksgivings, and petitions.

Matthew 6:9-14 (ESV) Pray then like this: “Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you…

  1. Discuss the “Why” behind Why We Pray

One of the best reminders I can give myself about why it’s important to pray is the simple fact that Jesus did. Maybe your teenager isn’t going through anything difficult at the moment and doesn’t understand why he/she should pray when they’re not asking for anything.

Take the chance to point out that even Christ, in all His sinless perfection, made specific effort to get away and pray to His Heavenly Father. If Christ needed to do so, how much more do we as sinful humans?

  1. Give Them a Prayer Journal

I don’t know many teen girls who wouldn’t jump at the chance to own a new journal! There’s something so comforting and aesthetic about a fresh journal and a new pen.

Purchasing your teen—boy or girl!—a prayer journal and their favorite box of colored pens or markers might be one way to get them interested in writing their prayers. This can be especially helpful if your teen struggles to focus mentally and tends to drift off into distraction when they pray. Writing requires a different type of mental effort and could be a solution.

Also, it’s cool for teens to be able to look back when they’re adults and have a tangible reminder of how they grew in their faith over the years.

  1. Challenge Them to Pray for Something Specific and Watch for Results

There’s nothing more motivating to pray than watching an answered prayer come to pass. While we know that God’s ways are higher than ours, and that not all our prayers will be answered with a “yes”, it’s so encouraging when they are.

To pique your teen’s interest in this partnership with the Lord, encourage them to pray for something specific and then watch for the results. Maybe it’s for healing, or for a friend to come to salvation. Maybe it’s to make a good grade on a big test coming up. Whatever is important to them in their life right now, challenge them to pray for it and then look for the Lord at work.

This could also be a great opportunity to point out how God answers prayers in different ways—sometimes with “no” or “wait.”

  1. Explain the Benefits of Prayer

Your teen is probably more naturally bent toward prayer when they need something. Maybe they’re hoping a certain boy or girl asks them to the dance at school, or they’re struggling with math, or maybe are going through a health issue they need relief from. Those are good times to pray—the Bible makes it clear we are free to bring our petitions to the Lord.

But be sure to point out that prayer isn’t just asking for things—it’s also praise and thanksgiving. And when we’re worshiping the Lord with praise through prayer, we’re naturally filled with peace. Our anxieties fade. Our tension eases. We’re trading our burdens for the Lord’s comfort and filling our minds with thoughts of Him, rather than the world around us.

Philippians 4:6-7 (ESV) …do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

  1. Pray Together

Be sure to pray with your teenager. While this can be awkward at first, it’s a great habit to get into. It doesn’t have to be long or official—taking turns saying a quick prayer in the carpool line on the way to school or at the end of the night can be a simple way to normalize prayer for your teen and get them used to praying out loud.

This will build their confidence and likely cause them to pray more often on their own.

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Russian Attack On America’s Power Grid “Imminent?” – CLICK HERE FOR INFO!

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Shocking Truth About The Biggest Threat To Come – CLICK HERE FOR INFO!

Urologist: Try This if You Have An Enlarged Prostate – CLICK HERE TO WATCH VIDEO!

How Should Christians Approach Dating

I’m not looking to date anyone until after I graduate from college, but I do ponder how Christian should go about dating in our app based dating society where everyone bases who they want to date just on how they look on the outside and not what makes them who they really are on the inside…I know this sounds “cheesy”, but I hope that the man I marry loves me for me and not for anything other than that.

Among modern evangelical Christians, there have been multiple books, movements, and rules presented as the “biblical” approach or method to dating. From Joshua Harris’ I Kissed Dating Goodbye in the early 2000s to the many rules for dating in contemporary Christian circles, there is no end to supposed scriptural views on dating.

Amid this overwhelming sea of methods and rules, many Christians wonder what the Bible says about this overly discussed topic and how they should approach dating.

Specifically, there is nothing in the Bible about dating. In fact, none of the people mentioned in the Bible ever dated but rather participated in prearranged marriages and betrothals. The modern Western idea of dating did not exist in biblical times and even many cultures today do not practice dating either.

Scripture, however, does provide a few general principles that can be applied to the modern practice of dating and courtship, including maintaining a proper perspective while dating and focusing on purity in romantic relationships.

Common ‘Biblical’ Methods and Rules for Dating
In churches and Christian culture, there are many popular rules for dating. Some of these include not holding hands or not showing affection, only dating someone with the intention of marrying them, only dating for a set period, having a required chaperone on dates, or not dating at all in order to wait for a person’s “one true love” to come.

These rules are not found in the Bible since Scripture does not discuss dating. Instead, these assumptions have developed over time due to major movements in Christian culture.

In the early 2000s, Joshua Harris’ book, I Kissed Dating Goodbye, swept through the Christian world and encouraged Christians to no longer date, but wait for the one person whom they would marry.

Many believers followed the teachings found in the book and refused to date anyone to instead wait for the divinely chosen person whom God intended for them to marry. Such teachings gradually declined in popularity and Joshua Harris recanted his book in 2016 and announced he was no longer a Christian in 2019.

Currently, the popular trend among evangelical Christians is to prepare and pray for their future spouse. This is especially popular among Christian girls and women who are encouraged to prepare, pray, and dream about their future husbands. Dating is not discouraged but is rather pushed into strict seriousness by requiring Christians to date with the intention of marrying.

The problem with this view, however, is that there is nothing in Scripture about praying for one’s future spouse, someone that is unknown or may not even exist. While Christians can participate in dating, there is no biblical promise or guarantee that every Christian will have a spouse.

Maintaining a Proper Perspective While Dating
For Christians, their first priority in all situations should always be the Lord (Matthew 6:33; Luke 10:27). Oftentimes in dating, people become infatuated and almost obsessed with their new boyfriend or girlfriend. Other important relationships often take a back seat to the new person they are dating.

Even a Christian’s relationship with the Lord can be negatively impacted by putting too much focus, time, and energy into pursuing dating or a new relationship. As Marshall Segel states in his article about dating, “The first step in dating should always be the step of faith we take toward our Lord, Savior, and greatest Treasure, King Jesus” (“The Golden Rule in Christian Dating,” Desiring God).

Just as each individual Christian should be deliberate about their relationship with the Lord, seeking to glorify Him in their life, they should also ensure that the person they are dating is completely in love with the Lord. Believers should not date unbelievers because of the possibility of marriage in any dating relationship (2 Corinthians 6:14-15).

Also, even if a Christian is dating a believer, they need to be aware of the other person’s relationship with God. Are they actively growing in their walk with Christ? Do they desire to love Him more than anything in the world, including being in a relationship or getting married? Believers should be aware of the spiritual state of the person they are seriously dating.

Finally, in regard to keeping a proper perspective while dating, Christians should also avoid falling into the trap of desperation. The church culture in the Western world, especially America, places a large emphasis on marriage, which places pressure on single believers to get married.

This often causes single Christians to become desperate and to date anyone because of the pressure to be married often just to have sex within the confines of marriage. Such a mindset goes against the Bible, which urges believers to seriously consider marriage or singleness based on legitimate reasons and not because of external pressure (1 Corinthians 7:35).

Although these Christians can still date with the intention of finding someone to marry, there is still the possibility that they will remain single for a part or the rest of their life. Being single is not a lesser state but has many great benefits in serving the Lord (1 Corinthians 7:32, 34).

Believers would be wise not to waste the time they have as single individuals, but instead pray and be open to God’s guidance about when, who, and if they should be dating.

The Need for Biblical Purity
While Scripture does not give any rules for how a person should date, the Bible does teach about the need to maintain purity in romantic relationships (1 Corinthians 6:13). Purity is a foreign idea to the worldly system, which promotes sexual immorality.

Many unbelievers and even some believers will commonly date someone, live with them for a while, and then find another boyfriend or girlfriend. However, Christians who want to live glorifying lives for Christ according to the Bible should avoid the temptation of living with their girlfriend or boyfriend and instead maintain celibacy until marriage.

Teenagers and young adults are especially susceptible to the temptation of sexual relations outside of marriage because of the inundation of lust-inducing messages from movies, TV shows, music, and celebrities.

Scripture speaks against this, however, by stating, “Run from anything that stimulates youthful lusts. Instead, pursue righteous living, faithfulness, love, and peace. Enjoy the companionship of those who call on the Lord with pure hearts” (2 Timothy 2:22, NLT). Sexual relations should only occur within the bonds of marriage, between a husband and his wife (Matthew 19:4-6; Hebrews 13:4).

Thus, Christians who are dating should avoid any situations for the temptation to sin (1 Corinthians 6:18). Having accountability to godly family members and friends can help protect against sinning against the Lord and the person one is dating.

Also, asking for friends to double date could also be helpful in some situations. Believers should be aware of their hearts and know what will cause temptation, which can help prevent compromising situations of impurity.

If a Christian is tempted during a date, they should pray and seek to leave the situation (1 Corinthians 10:13). Both men and women followers of Christ should pursue purity in their dating relationships to glorify the Lord and follow His Word (1 Corinthians 6:19-20).

Christians and Dating
Though there are many dating methods and rules suggested in Christian circles, the Bible does not explicitly discuss how a Christian should approach dating. However, Christians need to view dating differently than those in the world, which promotes impurity and sexual immorality.

Instead of merely thinking about their own preferences in finding a boyfriend or girlfriend with the intention of marrying, believers should place God first in their lives and seek to be pleasing to Him in all they do, including dating.

Staying focused on one’s love for God will provide a proper perspective for romantic relationships since God is the one who provides ultimate fulfillment and love.

MORE ARTICLES ALL CHRISTIANS SHOULD BE AWARE OF….

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Russian Attack On America’s Power Grid “Imminent?” – CLICK HERE FOR INFO!

Anyone with Enlarged Prostate Should Watch This – CLICK HERE

If You Believe in God, CLICK HERE to Watch This. It Will Blow Your Mind!

Shocking Truth About The Biggest Threat To Come – CLICK HERE FOR INFO!

Urologist: Try This if You Have An Enlarged Prostate – CLICK HERE TO WATCH VIDEO!

Bible Quotes That Offer Inspiration for Each Day

Our world is constantly changing and it seems like we face new struggles each morning. If you are feeling overwhelmed with anxious thoughts and worries about the unknown, this collection of Bible quotes will offer inspiration for your soul! Whether you are a lifelong follower of Christ, a new believer, or a skeptic, these Scripture verses can be used for motivation, guidance, and comfort. We have collected our favorite quotes from the Bible that you can turn to daily for strength. As you are encouraged by these verses, share them with your friends and family so that you can comfort others!

Read some of the following Bible quotes each morning to start the day inspired and reminded of God’s love for you!

Dear God, thank you for your amazing power and work in our lives, thank you for your goodness and for your blessings over us. Thank you that you are able to bring hope through even the toughest of times, strengthening us for your purposes. Thank you for your great love and care. Thank you for your mercy and grace. Thank you that you are always with us and will never leave us. Renew our spirits, fill us with your peace and joy. We love you and we need you, this day and every day. Amen!

Philippians 4:13
“I can do all things through Christ who gives me strength.”

Proverbs 3:5-6
“Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.”

Jeremiah 29:11
“For I know the plans I have for you”, declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

Deuteronomy 31:8
“The Lord himself goes before you and will be with youl he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid, do not be discouraged.”

Romans 8:28
“And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

10 Lies Satan Feeds Christians about Worship

Worship is an integral part of the Christian life. It allows us to solidify our relationship with God, and reminds us to focus our hearts and minds on his word. In the same way a human body requires food and water, so does our spiritual health depend on worship. Without it, our hearts grow cold and our faith withers into nothing.
Scripture tells us that the devil will do anything to get between us and God. 1 Peter 5:8 even warns us to be, “Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.”

Our enemy will wait, and scheme, and hunt for any sign of weakness in our lives. It shouldn’t come as any shock that he’ll try to sabotage our worship. In the days ahead, be sure to put on the armor of God, and keep these 10 lies from stealing your joy!

  1. Worship is All about You
  2. You Should Be “Getting Something” Out of Worship
  3. Worship is Irrelevant; it Doesn’t Matter
  4. Only Exciting, Emotional Worship Matters
  5. The Quality of Your Offering Does Not Matter
  6. The Architecture Must Be Conducive to Worship
  7. Everyone Else Worships Better Than You
  8. Your Feeble Attempts are an Insult to the Lord
  9. We Pay the Preachers to Worship for Us
  10. Worship is A Passive Activity

Meet the Christian Tech Executive Who Wants to Save Silicon Valley’s Soul

Of all the rituals of modern life that Silicon Valley technologists have burrowed their way into — eating, exercising, communicating, doing the laundry — one ritual that’s stayed largely undisrupted is religion. Despite its other advances, Silicon Valley remains one of the least religious parts of the country.

Vincent “Skip” Vaccarello is trying to change that. A 30-year veteran of the tech industry, Vaccarello was an executive at VisiCorp, an early PC-software-maker, and has been the CEO of Applied Weather Technology and Communications Solutions Inc., as well as a division manager for 3Com. He’s also a Christian, and has spent the last two decades trying to spread the gospel to Silicon Valley’s masses. He’s the chair of the Silicon Valley Prayer Breakfast, and the author of “Finding God in Silicon Valley,” a blog containing interviews with prominent Silicon Valley Christians that he is hoping to turn into a book.

I spoke to Vaccarello about his blog, his efforts to evangelize Silicon Valley, and what makes it hard to convert the tech-savvy. Here’s a condensed and edited version of our conversation.

Tech workers in Silicon Valley tend to be young, progressive, and very secular. Is this the hardest community in America to convert?

It is. George Barna [the evangelical pollster] did a survey and indicated that on any given Sunday, less than 5 percent of the people in Silicon Valley go to church. Silicon Valley people are smart skeptics. They also tend to live isolated lives. There are many transplants from other countries and states. Many of those people have not developed deep relationships. They desire to be successful. They want to change the world.

But at the same time, people are very skeptical of Christianity. Among the more successful, there’s a complacency. They think, Life seems great, I’ve got my stock options.

The guiding principle of Silicon Valley seems to be that the world can be perfected through technology. That hope seems to substitute for religious purpose in a lot of the tech people I know. Is that something you’ve seen?

I’d agree with that. I have a friend who did a book called Soul in Silicon, and his conclusion was that Silicon Valley is actually a very spiritual place, but that some of it is what you mentioned — people are, in a way, worshiping technology and success.

What I’ve found is that God is at work in Silicon Valley in the lives of many people. There really is a very committed group of people who have the desire to help others in their faith, who are committed to charity, who want to make the world a better place.

For a lot of people in Silicon Valley, though, the attitude seems to be that doing the work of technological advancement itself is a form of charity — that the world is better because they’re succeeding.

I’ve had many people say that. But people go through setbacks. It might be a divorce. It might be that stock options that were worth millions are now worth nothing. Or maybe they get fired from a job. When that happens, there are opportunities to talk about something that’s more important.

You’re saying there’s a counter-cyclical thing going on? When the tech bubble bursts and things are really bad for Silicon Valley companies, it will be good for Silicon Valley churches?

I do think there are absolutely those opportunities. I remember back in 1989, when the earthquake happened, Silicon Valley churches were packed with people. People were shaken up by it. People were saying, “There has to be something else.”

Skip, what made you decide to take up this cause?

I grew up in the Boston area – loving family, attended a Catholic church. But I was also a child of the late sixties and early seventies. And during college at Harvard, I kind of walked away from faith. Then, about twenty years later, a few people came into my life, and I began to think about faith. During that time, I was mostly building a career and a family. But the birth of our first child, I felt, was a miracle. And then our neighbors invited my wife to church. I was in Paris on business at the time, but she dragged me along when I got back. That was in the mid-eighties.

So I listened to what the pastor had to say, and over the next several months, I investigated the evidence for Christianity and really came to faith. And from that point forward, I really had a desire to live out my faith. So I got together a group of Silicon Valley executives, to say, “Well, how do we live out our faith day-to-day?”

And when did the blog come into play?

I went back to a Harvard reunion in 2008. There was a group of Christians who got together for a discussion, and right after that meeting, we got a book called Finding God at Harvard by Kelly Monroe. That planted a seed in my own mind to do something similar for Silicon Valley. One of [Monroe’s] purposes in writing that book was to show that you can be intelligent and still have faith. In Silicon Valley, a lot of people put material things and their career first, but I found it was really only God who could fill that space.

As a Christian in tech, what do you make of this issue, which seems to be a very contentious one, about start-ups and the homeless? Some tech workers have been publicly disparaging the homeless, saying that they need to get out of the “respectable” communities of Silicon Valley and go somewhere else.

I would hope that someone who is a follower of Christ would approach it differently. We’re to take care of the poor and the homeless.

Say you have a 22-year-old Google employee who is not religious, who is making a lot of money and living in Silicon Valley. How would you approach them and convince them to find Jesus?

There’s probably nothing I could do to convince such a person. It may sound odd, but it’s up to God. My hope is that some of the things I’m doing here will help. Service is one of the important ways to do it. Young people, whether they’re a Christian or not, have a desire to serve other people. That person might have his or her eyes opened if they were to go to a homeless shelter, to CityTeam or Freedom House, and in the process, they say, “Why are you doing this?” And we say, “Well, I’m a follower of Christ, and this is what I’m supposed to do.”

We also live in a little bit of a celebrity culture. I’m hoping that people might see someone like Pat Gelsinger, the CEO of VMWare, and a very committed follower of Christ, that someone might look at him and say, “Well, he’s different.” But if you’re talking about someone that’s happy, with lot of stock options and a cushy job at Google, it’s going to be difficult.

Who would be the ultimate convert? Mark Zuckerberg? Jack Dorsey?

Well, yeah, those are the current heroes. If any of those people were to say, “Okay, I’ve found the key to life,” that’d be great.

But some of it is going to come through service. The deficit that many Christians face is that people look at followers of Christ more for what they’re against than what they’re for.

That’s a big thing, I think. If you ask people in Silicon Valley why they’re not evangelicals, a lot would say, “Because I support gay marriage,” or “Because I support a woman’s right to choose.” How do you get around that?

There are people on the right and the left that are followers of Christ. But it’s unfortunate in some ways that Christianity has been identified exclusively as a right-wing group. When I have discussions with people, I don’t get into politics. To me, it’s not about politics. If someone’s gay, they’re gay, and that’s their lifestyle. I would talk more about the person of Christ.

Part of what’s interesting to me, about all of this, is that Silicon Valley is actually a place with a ton of faith. It’s just not faith in God. It’s faith in technology, in the future, in the power of innovation to shape society. Is there any way in which Silicon Valley might actually be well-suited to a religious revival?

People here live isolated lives. Christianity is about relationships and community. Yesterday, I was interviewing a guy, he’s a biotech guy, he’s brilliant. God has given him the mission in life of helping make the world a better place through biotechnology. He’s been doing stuff that is saving millions of lives with the product his company made.

Other people feel they’re on a mission to change the world in other ways. And maybe they make a billion dollars. But my hope is that when people go through a tough time, they’ll look at the site or read the book, find out more about what it is, and say, “Maybe these people aren’t as crazy as I thought they were.”